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Company Information

Home » Market » Company Information

SRF Ltd.

Nov 26
2089.50 -92.40 ( -4.23 %)
 
VOLUME : 56609
Prev. Close 2181.90
Open Price 2175.10
TODAY'S LOW / HIGH
2080.00
 
 
 
2175.10
Bid PRICE (QTY.) 0.00 (0)
Offer PRICE (Qty.) 0.00 (0)
52 WK LOW / HIGH
1006.17
 
 
 
2544.00
Nov 26
2091.05 -93.75 ( -4.29 %)
 
VOLUME : 855393
Prev. Close 2184.80
Open Price 2160.00
TODAY'S LOW / HIGH
2080.60
 
 
 
2160.00
Bid PRICE (QTY.) 0.00 (0)
Offer PRICE (Qty.) 0.00 (0)
52 WK LOW / HIGH
1005.28
 
 
 
2538.00
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Market Cap. ( ₹ ) 61983.12 Cr. P/BV 9.04 Book Value ( ₹ ) 231.28
52 Week High/Low ( ₹ ) 2538/1005 FV/ML 10/1 P/E(X) 51.74
Bookclosure 14/10/2021 TTM EPS ( ₹ ) 50.04 Div Yield (%) 1.15
NOTES TO ACCOUNTS
You can view the entire text of Notes to accounts of the company for the latest year
Year End :2021-03 

Based on the nature of products and the time between acquisition of assets for processing and their realisation in cash and cash equivalents, the Company has identified twelve months as its operating cycle for the purpose of current / non current classification of assets and liabilities.

3. Property, plant and equipment (PPE)

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost of acquisition or construction less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any.

All items of property, plant and equipment have been measured at fair value at the date of transition to Ind AS. The Company have opted such fair valuation as deemed cost at the transition date i.e. April 1, 2015.

Cost of acquisition or construction is inclusive of freight, duties, non-recoverable taxes, incidental expenses and interest on loans attributable to the acquisition of qualifying assets, up to the date of commissioning of the assets.

Such cost includes the cost of replacing part of the plant and equipment and borrowing costs for qualifying assets, upto the date of commissioning of the assets.

Likewise, when a major inspection for faults is performed, its cost is recognised in the carrying amount of the plant and equipment as a replacement if the recognition criteria is satisfied. All other repair and maintenance costs are recognised in the statement of profit and loss as incurred.

If significant parts of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, then they are accounted for as separate items of property, plant and equipment and depreciated accordingly.

Assets are classified to the appropriate categories of property, plant and equipment when completed and ready for intended use.

Capital Work in Progress: Project under which assets are not yet ready for their intended use are carried at cost comprising direct cost, related incidental expenses and attributable interest.

Spare parts are capitalized when they meet the definition of PPE, i.e., when the Company intends to use these for a period of more than 12 months.

4. Depreciation

Depreciable amount for assets is the cost of an asset, or other amount substituted for cost, less its estimated residual value.

Depreciation has been provided on the cost of assets less their residual values on straight line method on the basis of estimated useful life of assets determined by the Company which are different from the useful life as prescribed in Schedule II of the 2013 Act. The estimated useful life of the assets have been assessed based on technical advice, taking into account the nature of the asset, the estimated usage of the asset, the operating conditions of the asset, past history of replacement, anticipated technological changes, manufacturers warranties and maintenance support, etc. and are as under:

Roads

40-50 years

Buildings (including temporary structures)

5-60 years

Plant and equipment

2-40 years

Furniture and fixtures

3-20 years

Office equipment

3-20 years

Vehicles

4-5 years

for the year ended March 31, 2021

(All amounts in ' Crores, unless otherwise stated)

Freehold land is not depreciated.

Depreciation is calculated on a pro rata basis except assets costing upto ' 5,000 each, which are fully depreciated in the year of purchase.

An item of property, plant and equipment or any significant part initially recognised of such item of property plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal. Any gain or loss arising on derecognition of the asset (calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset) is included in the statement of profit and loss when the asset is derecognised.

The estimated useful lives and methods of depreciation of property, plant and equipment are reviewed at each financial year end and adjusted prospectively, if appropriate.

5. Intangible Assets

Intangible assets acquired separately are measured on initial recognition at cost.

Following initial recognition, intangible assets are carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses, if any.

Internally generated intangibles, excluding capitalised development costs, are not capitalised and the related expenditure is reflected in profit or loss in the period in which the expenditure is incurred.

Intangible assets with finite lives are amortised over the useful economic life and assessed for impairment whenever there is an indication that the intangible asset may be impaired. The useful lives considered are as follows:

The Company has elected to continue with the carrying value of all of its intangibles assets recognised as on April 1, 2015 measured as per the previous GAAP and use that carrying value as its deemed cost as of transition date.

The amortisation period and the amortisation method for an intangible asset with a finite useful life are reviewed at least at the end of each reporting period. Changes in the expected useful life or the expected pattern of consumption of future economic benefits embodied in the asset are considered to modify the amortisation period or method, as appropriate, and are treated as changes in accounting estimates. The amortisation expense on intangible assets with finite lives is recognised in the statement of profit and loss unless such expenditure forms part of carrying value of another asset.

An intangible asset is derecognised on disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected from use or disposal. Gains or losses arising from derecognition of an intangible asset are measured as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset and are recognised in the statement of profit or loss when the asset is derecognised.

6. Research and development expenditure Expenditure on research and development of products is included under the natural heads of expenditure in the year in which it is incurred except which relate to development activities whereby research findings are applied to a plan or designfor the production of new or substantially improved products and processes.

Such development costs are capitalised if they can be reliably measured, the product or process is technically and commercially feasible and the Company has sufficient resources to complete the development and to use or sell the asset.

Following initial recognition of the development expenditure as an asset, the asset is carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses, if any. Amortisation of the asset begins when development is complete and the asset is available for use. It is amortised over the period of expected future benefit. Amortisation expense is recognised in the statement of profit and loss unless such expenditure forms part of carrying value of another asset. During the period of development, the asset is tested for impairment annually.

7. Goodwill

Goodwill arising on an acquisition of a business is carried at cost as established at the date of acquisition of the business less accumulated impairment losses, if any.

For the purposes of impairment testing, goodwill is allocated to each of the Company's cash-generating units that is expected to benefit from the synergies of the combination.

A cash-generating unit to which goodwill has been allocated is tested for impairment annually, or more frequently when there is an indication that the unit may be impaired. If the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit is less than its carrying amount, the impairment loss is allocated first to reduce the carrying amount of any goodwill allocated to the unit and then to

the other assets of the unit pro rata based on the carrying amount of each asset in the unit. Any impairment loss for goodwill is recognised directly in profit or loss. An impairment loss recognised for goodwill is not reversed in subsequent periods.

On disposal of the relevant cash-generating unit, the attributable amount of goodwill is included in the determination of the profit or loss on disposal.

3. Impairment of tangible and intangible assets other than goodwill The Company assesses, at each reporting date, whether there is an indication that an asset may be impaired. If any indication exists, or when annual impairment testing for an asset is required, the Company estimates the asset's recoverable amount. An asset's recoverable amount is the higher of an asset's or cash-generating unit's (CGU) fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use.

Recoverable amount is determined for an individual asset, unless the asset does not generate cash inflows that are largely independent of those from other assets or groups of assets.

Impairment loss is recognised when the carrying amount of an asset or CGU exceeds its recoverable amount. In such cases, the asset is considered impaired and is written down to its recoverable amount.

In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. In determining fair value less costs of disposal, recent market transactions are taken into account. If no such transactions can be identified,

an appropriate valuation model is used. These calculations are corroborated by valuation multiples or other available fair value indicators.

The Company bases its impairment calculation on detailed budgets and forecast, which are prepared separately for each of the Company's CGUs to which the individual assets are allocated. These budgets and forecast calculations generally cover a period of 5 years. For longer periods, a long-term growth rate is calculated and applied to project future cash flows after 5th year. To estimate cash flow projections beyond periods covered by the most recent budgets/forecasts, Company extrapolates cash flow projections in the budget using a steady or declining growth rate for subsequent years, unless an increasing rate can be justified.

For assets excluding goodwill, an assessment is made at each reporting date to determine whether there is an indication that previously recognised impairment losses no longer exist or have decreased. If such indication exists, the Company estimates the asset's or CGU's recoverable amount. A previously recognised impairment loss is reversed only if there has been a change in the assumptions used to determine the asset's recoverable amount since the last impairment loss was recognised. The reversal is limited so that the carrying amount of the asset does not exceed its recoverable amount, nor exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation, had no impairment loss been recognised for the asset in prior years.

9. Leasing

At inception of a contract, the Company assesses whether a contract is, or contains, a lease. A contract is, or contains, a lease

if the contract conveys the right to control the use of an identified asset for a period of time in exchange for consideration. To assess whether a contract conveys the right to control the use of an identified asset, the Company assess whether:

- the contract involves the use of an identified asset - this may be specified explicitly or implicitly and should be physically distinct or represent substantially all of the capacity of a physically distinct asset. If the supplier has a substantive substitution right, then the asset is not identified;

- the Company has the right to obtain substantially all of the economic benefits from use of the asset through the period of use; and

- the Company has the right to direct the use of the asset. The Company has this right when it has the decisionmaking rights that are most relevant to changing how and for what purpose the asset is used. In rare cases, where the decision about how and for what purpose the asset is used is predetermined, the Company has the right to direct the use of the asset if either:

• the Company has the right to operate the asset; or

• the Company designed the asset in a way that predetermines how and for what purpose it will be used

An entity shall reassess whether a contract is, or contains, a lease only if the terms and conditions of the contract are changed.

At inception or on reassessment of a contract that contains a lease component, the Company allocates

the consideration in the contract to each lease component on the basis of their relative stand-alone prices.

Company as lessee

The Company accounts for assets taken under lease arrangement in the following manner:

The Company recognises a right-of-use asset and a lease liability at the lease commencement date. The right of use asset is initially measured at cost, which comprises the initial amount of the lease liability adjusted for any lease payments made at or before the commencement date, plus any initial direct costs incurred and an estimate of costs to dismantle and remove the underlying asset or to restore the underlying asset or the site on which it is located, less any lease incentive received.

The right of use asset is subsequently depreciated using the straight line method from the commencement date to the end of the lease term. The estimated useful lives of right-of-use assets are determined on the basis of remaining lease term. In addition, the right-of-use asset is periodically reduced by impairment losses, if any, and adjusted for certain remeasurements of the lease liability.

The lease liability is initially measured at the present value of the lease payments that are not paid at the commencement date, discounted using the Company's incremental borrowing rate.

Lease payments included in the measurement of the lease liability comprise the fixed payments, including in-substance fixed payments.

The lease liability is measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method.

It is remeasured when there is a change in future lease payments arising from a change in an index or rate, if there is a change in Company's estimate of the amount expected to be payable under a residual value guarantee, or if the Company changes its assessment of whether it will exercise a purchase, extension or termination option.

When the lease liability is remeasured in this way, a corresponding adjustment is made to the carrying amount of the right-of-use asset, or is recorded in profit or loss if the carrying amount of the right-of-use asset has been reduced to zero.

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

The Company has elected not to recognise right-of use assets and lease liabilities for short term leases that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low value assets. The Company recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight- line basis over the lease term.

10. Borrowing costs

Borrowing costs consist of interest and other costs that an entity incurs in connection with the borrowing of funds. Borrowing cost also includes exchange differences to the extent regarded as an adjustment to the borrowing costs.

Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of an asset that necessarily takes a substantial period of time to get ready for its intended use or sale are capitalised as part of the cost of the asset. Borrowing costs incurred for the period from commencement of activities relating to construction/ development of the qualifying asset upto the date of capitalisation of such asset are

added to the cost of the asset. All other borrowing costs are expensed in the period in which they occur.

In case of a specific borrowing taken for the purpose of acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying asset, the borrowing costs capitalised shall be the actual borrowing costs incurred during the period less any interest income earned on temporary investment of specific borrowing pending expenditure on qualifying asset.

In case funds are borrowed generally and such funds are used for the purpose of acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying asset, the borrowing costs capitalised are calculated by applying the weighted average capitalisation rate on general borrowings outstanding during the period, to the expenditures incurred on the qualifying asset.

If any specific borrowing remains outstanding after the related asset is ready for its intended use, that borrowing is considered part of the funds that are borrowed generally for calculating the capitalisation rate.

11. Foreign Currencies

Transactions in foreign currencies are recorded on initial recognition at the exchange rate prevailing on the date of the transaction.

(i) Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currency remaining unsettled at the end of the year, are translated at the closing rates prevailing on the Balance Sheet date. Non-monetary items which are carried in terms of historical cost denominated in foreign currency are reported using the exchange rate at the date of transaction. Any gains or losses arising

due to differences in exchange rates at the time of translation or settlement are accounted for in the Statement of Profit and Loss either under the head foreign exchange fluctuation or interest cost, as the case may be, except those relating to exchange differences arising from cash flow hedges to the extent that the hedges are effective and those covered below.

(ii) Exchange differences pertaining to long term foreign currency loans obtained or re-financed on or before March 31, 2016:

Exchange differences on long-term foreign currency monetary items relating to acquisition of depreciable assets are adjusted to the carrying cost of the assets and depreciated over the balance useful life of the assets.

(iii) Exchange differences pertaining to long term foreign currency loans obtained or re-financed on or after April 1, 2016:

The exchange differences pertaining to long term foreign currency loans obtained or re-financed on or after April 1, 2016 is treated in accodance with Ind AS 21/ Ind AS 109. Refer point (i) above.

12. Inventories

Inventories are valued at cost or net

realisable value, whichever is lower.

The basis of determining the cost for various

categories of inventory are as follows:

(a) Raw materials, packing materials and stores and spares (including fuel) -Cost includes cost of purchase and other costs incurred in bringing the inventories to their present location and condition. Cost is determined on

weighted average basis. The aforesaid items are valued at Net Realisable Value if the finished products in which they are to be incorporated are expected to be sold at a loss.

(b) Traded goods, Stock in progress and finished goods- Direct cost plus appropriate share of overheads.

(c) By products - At estimated realisable value

Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs of completion and the estimated costs necessary to make the sale.

13. Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets Provisions

The Company recognises a provision when there is a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of past events and it is more likely than not that an outflow of resources would be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made.

When the Company expects some or all of a provision to be reimbursed, for example, under an insurance contract, the reimbursement is recognised as a separate asset, but only when the reimbursement is virtually certain.

The expense relating to a provision is presented in the statement of profit and loss net of any reimbursement.

If the effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are discounted using a current pre-tax rate that reflects, when appropriate, the risks specific to the liability. When discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognised as a finance cost.

Contingent liabilities

A contingent liability is a possible obligation that arises from past events whose existence will be confirmed by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events beyond the control of the Company or a present obligation that is not recognised because it is not probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation. A contingent liability also arises in extremely rare cases where there is a liability that cannot be recognised because it cannot be measured reliably. The Company does not recognize a contingent liability but discloses its existence in the financial statements unless the possibility of an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is remote. Contingent liabilities and commitments are reviewed by the management at each balance sheet date.

Contingent assets

Contingent assets are neither recognised nor disclosed in the financial statements. However, contingent assets are assessed continually and if it is virtually certain that an inflow of economic benefits will arise, the asset and related income are recognised in the period in which the change occurs.

14. Revenue recognition

a) Sale of goods

Revenue from sale of products is recognised upon transfer of control of products to customers at the time of shipment to or receipt of goods by the customers. Service income is recognised as and when the underlying services are performed. The Company exercises judgement in determining whether the performance obligation is satisfied at a point in time or over a period of time.

Revenues are measured based on the transaction price, which is the consideration, net of tax collected from customers and remitted to government authorities such as goods and services tax and applicable discounts and allowances.

Any fees including upfront fees received in relation to contract manufacturing arrangements is recognised on straight line basis over the period over which the Company satisfies the underlying performance obligations. Contract assets are recognised when there is excess of revenue earned over billings on contracts. Contract assets are classified as unbilled revenue (only act of invoicing is pending) when there is unconditional right to receive cash as per contractual terms. Advance from customers ("contract liability") is recognised when the Company has received consideration from the customer before it delivers the goods.

b) Interest and dividend income Interest income is recognised when it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Company using the effective interest rate and the amount of income can be measured reliably. Interest income is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding.

Dividend income from investments is recognised when the shareholder's right to receive payment has been established (provided that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Company and the amount of income can be measured reliably).

c) Export Incentives

The benefit accrued under the Duty Drawback scheme and other schemes as per the Export and Import Policy in

respect of exports made under the said Schemes is included under the head "Revenue from Operations" under 'Export and other Incentives'. Also refer policy on "government grants".

L5. Taxation

Income tax expense represents the sum of

current tax and deferred tax.

a) Current tax

Current income tax assets and liabilities are measured at the amount expected to be recovered from or paid to the taxation authorities. The tax rates and tax laws used to compute the amount are those that are enacted or substantively enacted, at the reporting date.

Current income tax relating to items recognised outside profit or loss is recognised outside profit or loss i.e. in other comprehensive income or in equity. Management periodically evaluates positions taken in the tax returns with respect to situations in which applicable tax regulations are subject to interpretation and establishes provisions where appropriate.

b) Deferred tax

Deferred tax is provided on temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts at the reporting date.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using substantively enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which the temporary differences are expected to be received or settled.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset if such items relate to taxes on income levied by the same governing tax laws and the Company has a legally enforceable right for such set off.

The Company considers whether it is probable that a taxation authority will accept an uncertain tax treatment. If the Company concludes that it is probable that the taxation authority will accept an uncertain tax treatment, the Company determines the taxable profit (tax loss), tax bases, unused tax losses, unused tax credits or tax rates consistently with the tax treatment used or planned to be used in its income tax filings. However, if the Company concludes that it is not probable that the taxation authority will accept an uncertain tax treatment, the Company reflects the effect of uncertainty in determining the related taxable profit (tax loss), tax bases, unused tax losses, unused tax credits or tax rates.

16. Government grants

Government grants are recognised where there is reasonable assurance that the grant will be received and all attached conditions will be complied with.

A government grant that becomes receivable as compensation for expenses or losses incurred in a previous period. Such a grant is recognised in profit or loss of the period in which it becomes receivable.

Government grants are recognised in profit or loss on a systematic basis over the periods in which the Company recognises as expenses the related costs for which the grants are intended to compensate.

Government grants related to assets are presented in the balance sheet as deferred income and is recognised in profit or loss on a systematic basis over the expected useful life of the related assets.

17. Employee benefits Short-term employee benefits

Wages and salaries including non monetary benefits that are expected to be settled

Deferred tax assets are recognised for all deductible temporary differences and unused tax losses only if it is probable that future taxable amounts will be available to utilise those temporary differences and losses. The carrying amount of deferred tax assets is reviewed at each reporting date and reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that sufficient taxable profit will be available to allow all or part of the deferred tax asset to be utilised. Unrecognised deferred tax assets are re-assessed at each reporting date and are recognised to the extent that it has become probable that future taxable profits will allow the deferred tax asset to be recovered.

Deferred tax relating to items recognised outside profit or loss is recognised outside profit or loss i.e. in other comprehensive income or in equity.

Deferred tax assets/liabilities are not recognised for below mentioned temporary differences:

(i) At the time of initial recognition of goodwill;

(ii) Initial recognition of assets or liabilities (other than in a business combination) at the time of the transaction, affects neither the accounting profit nor taxable profit or loss;

Minimum Alternate Tax (MAT) paid in accordance with the tax laws, which gives future economic benefits in the form of adjustment to future income tax liability, is considered as an asset if there is convincing evidence that the Company will pay normal income tax. Accordingly, MAT asset is recognised in the Balance Sheet when it is probable that future economic benefit associated with it will flow to the Company.

within the operating cycle after the end of the period in which the related services are rendered, are measured at the undiscounted amount expected to be paid.

Defined contribution plans Provident fund administered through Regional Provident Fund Commissioner, Superannuation Fund and Employees' State Insurance Corporation are defined contribution schemes. Contributions to such schemes are charged to the statement of profit and loss in the year when employees have rendered services entitling them to contributions. The Company has no obligation, other than the contribution payable to such schemes.

Defined benefit plans

The Company has defined benefit gratuity plan and provident fund for certain category of employees administered through a recognised provident fund trust. Provision for gratuity and provident fund for certain category of employees administered through a recognised provident fund trust are determined on an actuarial basis at the end of the year and charged to Statement of Profit and Loss, other than remeasurements. The cost of providing these benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method.

Remeasurements, comprising of actuarial gains and losses and the effect of the asset ceiling, (excluding amounts included in net interest on the net defined benefit liability and return on plan assets), are recognised immediately in the balance sheet with a corresponding debit or credit to retained earnings through other comprehensive income in the period in which they occur. Remeasurements are not reclassified to statement of profit and loss in subsequent periods.

Other long-term employee benefits The Company also has other long-term employee benefits in the nature of compensated absences and long term retention pay. Provision for compensated absences and long term retention pay are determined on an actuarial basis at the end of the year and charged to Statement of Profit and Loss. The cost of providing these benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method.

Share based payments Equity settled share based payments to employees under SRF Long Term Share Based Incentive Plan (SRF LTIP) are measured at the fair value (which is the market price less exercise price) of the equity instruments on the grant date. This compensation expense is amortised over the remaining tenure over which the employees renders their service on a straight line basis.

18. Earnings per share

Basic earnings per share is calculated by dividing the net profit or loss for the year attributable to equity shareholders by the weighted average number of equity shares outstanding during the year.

For the purpose of calculating diluted earnings per share, the net profit or loss for the period attributable to equity shareholders and the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period is adjusted for the effects of all dilutive potential equity shares.

19. Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalent in the balance sheet comprise cash at banks and on hand and short-term deposits with an original maturity of three months or less, which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

The losses arising from impairment are recognised in the statement of profit and loss. This category generally applies to trade and other receivables.

Financial assets not classified as measured at amortised cost or FVTOCI as are measured at FVTPL. Financial assets included within the FVTPL category are measured at fair value with all changes recognised in the statement of profit and loss.

Equity Investments

All equity investments in the scope of Ind AS 109 are measured at fair value.

Equity instruments which are held for trading are measured at fair value through profit and loss.

For all other equity instruments, the Company may make an irrevocable election to present subsequent changes in the fair value in other comprehensive income. The Company makes such election on an instrument by instrument basis. The classification is made on initial recognition and is irrevocable.

If the Company decides to classify an equity instrument as at FVTOCI, then all fair value changes on the instrument, excluding dividends, are recognised in other comprehensive income. This cumulative gain or loss is not reclassified to statement of profit and loss on disposal of such instruments.

Investments representing equity interest in subsidiaries are carried at cost less any provision for impairment.

Derecognition

A financial asset (or, where applicable, a part of a financial asset) is primarily derecognised (i.e. removed from the balance sheet) when:

20. Financial instruments

A financial instrument is any contract that gives rise to a financial asset of one entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of another entity.

A) Financial assets

Initial recognition and measurement All financial assets are recognised initially at fair value plus transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition of the financial asset.

Subsequent measurement For purposes of subsequent measurement, financial assets of the Company are classified in three categories:

a) At amortised cost

b) At fair value through profit and loss (FVTPL)

c) At fair value through other comprehensive income (FVTOCI)

Financial Asset is measured at amortised cost if both the following conditions are met:

a) The asset is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets for collecting contractual cash flows, and

b) Contractual terms of the asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal amount outstanding.

After initial measurement, such financial assets are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate (EIR) method. Amortised cost is calculated by taking into account any discount or premium on acquisition and fees or costs that are an integral part of the EIR. The EIR amortisation is included in other income in the statement of profit and loss.

a) The rights to receive cash flows from the asset have expired, or

b) The Company has transferred its rights to receive cash flows from the asset or has assumed an obligation to pay the received cash flows in full without material delay to a third party under a 'pass-through' arrangement; and either (i) the Company has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset, or (ii) the Company has neither transferred nor retained substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset, but has transferred control of the asset.

When the Company has transferred its rights to receive cash flows from an asset or has entered into a pass-through arrangement, it evaluates if and to what extent it has retained the risks and rewards of ownership. When it has neither transferred nor retained substantially all of the risks and rewards of the asset, nor transferred control of the asset, the Company continues to recognise the transferred asset to the extent of the Company's continuing involvement. In that case, the Company also recognises an associated liability. The transferred asset and the associated liability are measured on a basis that reflects the rights and obligations that the Company has retained.

Continuing involvement that takes the form of a guarantee over the transferred asset is measured at the lower of the original carrying amount of the asset and the maximum amount of consideration that the Company could be required to repay. Any gain or loss on derecognition is recognised in profit or loss.

When the Company has retained substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the transferred asset,

the Company continues to recognise the transferred asset in its entirety and recognises a financial liability for the consideration received.

Impairment of financial assets The Company recognizes loss allowance using the expected credit loss (ECL) model for the financial assets which are not fair valued through profit or loss. Loss allowance for trade receivables with no significant financing component is measured at an amount equal to lifetime ECL. For all financial assets with contractual cash flows other than trade receivable, ECLs are measured at an amount equal to the 12-month ECL, unless there has been a significant increase in credit risk from initial recognition in which case those are measured at lifetime ECL. The amount of ECL (or reversal) that is required to adjust the loss allowance at the reporting date is recognised as an impairment gain or loss in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

B) Financial liabilities and Equity instruments Initial recognition and measurement All financial liabilities are recognised initially at fair value, net of directly attributable transaction costs, if any.

The Company's financial liabilities includes borrowings, trade and other payables including financial guarantee contracts and derivative financial instruments.

Subsequent measurement Borrowings

Borrowings are subsequently measured at amortised cost. Any differences between the proceeds (net of transaction costs) and the redemption/repayment amount is recognised in profit and loss over the period of the borrowings using the effective interest rate method.

Trade and other payables Trade and other payables represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the Company prior to the end of the financial year which are unpaid.

Offsetting of financial instruments Financial assets and financial liabilities are offset and the net amount is reported in the balance sheet if there is a currently enforceable legal right to offset the recognised amounts and there is an intention to settle on a net basis, to realise the assets and settle the liabilities simultaneously.

Financial guarantee contracts Financial guarantee contracts issued by the Company are those contracts that require a payment to be made to reimburse the holder for a loss it incurs because the specified entity fails to make a payment when due in accordance with the terms of a debt instrument. Financial guarantee contracts are recognised initially as a liability at fair value, adjusted for transaction costs that are directly attributable to the issuance of the guarantee.

Derecognition

A financial liability is derecognised when the obligation under the liability is discharged or cancelled or expires. When an existing financial liability is replaced by another from the same lender on substantially different terms, or the terms of an existing liability are substantially modified, such an exchange or modification is treated as the derecognition of the original liability and the recognition of a new liability. The difference in the respective carrying amounts is recognised in the statement of profit and loss.

Equity instrument

Equity instruments are any contract that evidences a residual interest in the assets of an entity after deducting all of its liabilities.

Debt or equity instruments issued by the Company are classified as either financial liabilities or as equity in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangements and the definitions of a financial liability and an equity instrument.

21. Derivative and non derivative financial instruments and hedge accounting Initial recognition and subsequent measurement The Company uses derivative financial instruments (such as forward currency contracts, interest rate swaps and full currency swaps) or non derivative financial assets / liabilities to hedge its foreign currency risks and interest rate risks. The Company has opted for "Hedge Accounting" for all its derivative as well as non-derivative financial instrument used for hedging. Accordingly, at the inception of the hedge the Company formally designates a hedge relationship between the 'hedging instrument' and 'hedged item' which determines the initial recognition of the financial intrument as Fair Value Hedge or Cashflow hedge. The documentation includes the Compnay's risk management objective and strategy for undertaking hedge, the hedging/ economic relationship, the hedged item or transaction, the nature of the risk being hedged and how the entity will assess the effectiveness of changes in the hedging instrument's fair value in offsetting the exposure to changes in the hedged item's fair value or cash flows attributable to the hedged risk. Such hedges are expected to be highly effective in achieving offsetting changes in fair value or cash flows and are assessed on an ongoing basis to determine that they actually have been highly effective throughout the financial reporting periods for which they were designated. These financial instruments are initially recognised at fair value on the date on which a derivative contract is entered into and are subsequently re-measured at

fair value. Derivatives are carried as financial assets when the fair value is positive and as financial liabilities when the fair value is negative.

Any gains or losses arising from changes in the fair value of derivatives are taken directly to profit or loss, except for the effective portion of cash flow hedges, which is recognised in OCI and later reclassified to profit and loss when the hedge item affects profit or loss.

For the purpose of hedge accounting, hedges are classified as:

a) Fair value hedges when hedging the exposure to changes in the fair value of a recognised asset or liability.

b) Cash flow hedges when hedging the exposure to variability in cash flows that is either attributable to a particular risk associated with a recognised asset or liability or a highly probable forecast transaction or the foreign currency risk in an unrecognised firm commitment.

Hedges that meet the strict criteria for hedge accounting are accounted for, as described below:

Fair value hedges

The change in the fair value of a hedging instrument is recognised in the statement of profit and loss. The change in the fair value of the hedged item attributable to the risk hedged is recorded as part of the carrying value of the hedged item and is also recognised in the statement of profit and loss.

If the hedged item is derecognised, the unamortised fair value is recognised immediately in profit or loss. When an unrecognised firm commitment is designated as a hedged item, the subsequent cumulative change in the fair value of the

firm commitment attributable to the hedged risk is recognised as an asset or liability with a corresponding gain or loss recognised in statement of profit and loss.

Cash flow hedges

The effective portion of the gain or loss on the hedging instrument is recognised in other comprehensive income in the cash flow hedge reserve, while any ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the statement of profit and loss.

The Company uses forward currency contracts as hedges of its exposure to foreign currency risk in forecast transactions and firm commitments. The ineffective portion relating to foreign currency contracts is recognised in the statement of profit and loss. In some cases, the Company separates the premium element and the spot element of a forward contract and designates only the change in fair value of the spot element of forward exchange contracts as the hedging instrument in cash flow hedging relationships. In such cases, the changes in the fair value of the premium element of the forward contract or the foreign currency basis spread of the financial instrument is accumulated in a separate component of equity as 'cost of hedging' The changes in the fair value of such premium element or foreign currency basis spread are reclassified to profit or loss as a reclassification adjustment on a straight-line basis over the period of the forward contract or the financial instrument.

The Company also designates non derivative financial liabilities, such as foreign currency borrowings from banks, as hedging instruments for the hedge of foreign currency risk associated with highly probable forecasted transactions and, accordingly, applies cash flow hedge accounting for such relationships.

Amounts recognised as other comprehensive income are transferred to profit or loss when the hedged transaction affects profit or loss, such as when the hedged financial income or financial expense is recognised or when a forecast transaction occurs.

If the hedging instrument expires or is sold, terminated or exercised without replacement or rollover (as part of the hedging strategy), or if its designation as a hedge is revoked, or when the hedge no longer meets the criteria for hedge accounting, the hedge accountig will be discontinued prospectively. Any cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in other comprehensive income remains separately in other equity if the forecast transaction or the foreign currency firm commitment is expected to occur else the amount shall be immediately reclassified from the cash flow hedge reserve to profit or loss as a reclassification adjustment.

22. Fair value measurement

The Company measures some of its financial instruments at fair value at each balance sheet date.

Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The fair value measurement is based on the presumption that the transaction to sell the asset or transfer the liability takes place either:

a) In the principal market for the asset or liability, or

b) In the absence of a principal market, in the most advantageous market for the asset or liability

The principal or the most advantageous market must be accessible by the Company. The fair value of an asset or a liability is measured using the assumptions that market participants would use when pricing

the asset or liability, assuming that market participants act in their economic best interest. A fair value measurement of a non-financial asset takes into account a market participant's ability to generate economic benefits by using the asset in its highest and best use or by selling it to another market participant that would use the asset in its highest and best use. The Company uses valuation techniques that are appropriate in the circumstances and for which sufficient data are available to measure fair value, maximising the use of relevant observable inputs and minimising the use of unobservable inputs. All assets and liabilities for which fair value is measured or disclosed in the financial statements are categorised within the fair value hierarchy, described as follows, based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement as a whole:

a) Level 1 — Quoted (unadjusted) market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

b) Level 2 — Inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly (i.e. as prices) or indirectly (i.e. derived from prices).

c) Level 3—Inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs).

For assets and liabilities that are recognised in the financial statements on a recurring basis, the Company determines whether transfers have occurred between levels in the hierarchy by re-assessing categorisation (based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement as a whole) at the end of each reporting period.

For the purpose of fair value disclosures, the Company has determined classes of

assets and liabilities on the basis of the nature, characteristics and risks of the asset or liability and the level of the fair value hierarchy as explained above.

23. Segment Reporting

Based on "Management Approach" as defined in Ind AS 108 -Operating Segments, the Chief Operating Decision Maker evaluates the Company's performance and allocates the resources based on an analysis of various performance indicators by business segments. Inter segment sales and transfers are reflected at market prices.

Unallocable items includes general corporate income and expense items which are not allocated to any business segment.

Segment Policies:

The Company prepares its segment information in conformity with the accounting policies adopted for preparing and presenting the standalone financial statements of the Company as a whole. Common allocable costs are allocated to each segment on an appropriate basis.

24. Dividend

The Company recognises a liability to make cash distributions to equity holders when the distribution is authorised and the distribution is no longer at the discretion of the Company. As per the corporate laws in India, a distribution is authorised when it is approved by the shareholders. A corresponding amount is recognised directly in equity.

25. Non-current assets held for sale and discontinued operations

Non-current assets (or disposal groups) are classified as held for sale if their carrying amounts will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use. The appropriate level of management must be committed

to a plan to sell, an active programme to locate a buyer and complete the plan has been initiated, the sale is considered highly probable and is expected within one year from the date of classification.

Non-current assets (or disposal groups) held for sale are measured at the lower of their carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell. Assets and liabilities classified as held for sale are presented separately from other assets and liabilities in the balance sheet. Property, plant and equipment and intangible assets once classified as held for sale are not depreciated or amortised.

A discontinued operation is a component of the Company that either has been disposed of, or is classified as held for sale, and:

a) Represents a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations,

b) Is part of a single co-ordinated plan to dispose of a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations, or

c) Is a subsidiary acquired exclusively with a view to resale.

Discontinued operations are excluded from the results of continuing operations and are presented separately in the statement of profit and loss.

26. Recent pronouncements

On March 24, 2021, the Ministry of Corporate Affairs ("MCA") through a notification, amended Schedule III of the Companies Act, 2013. The amendments revise Division I, II and III of Schedule III and are applicable from April 1, 2021. Key amendments relating to Division II which relate to companies whose financial statements are required to comply with Companies (Indian Accounting Standards) Rules 2015 are:

Balance Sheet

• Certain additional disclosures in the statement of changes in equity such as changes in equity share capital due to prior period errors and restated balances at the beginning of the current reporting period.

• Specified format for disclosure of shareholding of promoters.

• Specified format for ageing schedule of trade receivables, trade payables, capital work-in-progress and intangible asset under development.

• If a company has not used funds for the specific purpose for which it was borrowed from banks and financial institutions, then disclosure of details of where it has been used.

• Specific disclosure under 'additional

regulatory requirement' such as

compliance with approved schemes of arrangements, compliance with number of layers of companies, title deeds of immovable property not held in name of company, loans and advances to promoters, directors, key managerial personnel (KMP) and related parties, details of benami property held etc.

Statement of profit and loss:

• Additional disclosures relating to

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), undisclosed income and crypto or

virtual currency specified under the

head 'additional information' in the

notes forming part of the standalone financial statements.

The amendments are extensive and the Company will evaluate the same to give effect to them as required by law